Back to Resource Center

Article Excerpts:

Radiation protection concerns among staff performing Fluoroscopic procedures.

· E.P./Cath Lab

· Pain Management

· Radiology

Contents:

· Interventional Radiology Carries Occupational Risk for Cataracts

RSNA News, June 2004


· Radiation Protection in Interventional Radiology

Interventional Radiology, Vol. 1, Second Edition

· Potential Biological Effects Following High X-ray Dose Interventional Procedures

Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, January-February 1994

· Radiation Exposure During Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Accessory Atrioventricular Connections

Circulation, Vol. 84, No.6, December 1991

· Surface Shield: Device to Reduce Personnel Radiation Exposure

Radiology, Vol. 159, No. 3, June 1986

· Radiation Exposure in Endovascular Surgery of the Head and Neck

AJNR, November 1994

· Technical Note: An Assessment of X-ray Protective Gloves

The British Journal of Radiology, Vol. 68, No. 812, August 1995

· X-Radiation

The Art and Science of Medical Radiography, Seventh Edition

· Implementation of the Principle of as Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) for Medical and Dental Personnel

NCRP Report No. 107, December 1990

Compliments of:
AttenuTech

3975 Fifth Ave Suite 212 · San Diego CA 92103

Phone: 1.800.757.2703 · Toll-Free Fax (U.S.): 800-409-4808

Email: sales@barrieronline.com · Web: www.attenutech.com

Interventional Radiology Carries Occupational Risk for Cataracts

RSNA News, June 2004

Interventional Radiologists are at high risk of radiation-induced eye injury and should consider eye protection to avoid posterior subcapsular (PSC) cataract formation, according to research released at the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) annual meeting in March.

The researchers found that the frequency and severity of PSC cataracts increased with age and years in practice. Dr. Ziv J. Haskal, M.D. is urging interventional radiologists to more seriously consider wearing high-quality radiation eye protection.

The researchers found that nearly half of the interventional radiologists screened had signs of radiation-related lens changes.  "This study combined with other research shows that people are developing cataracts at much lower radiation doses than permissible limits allow," says Basil V. Worgul, Ph.D., a professor of radiation biology in ophthalmology and radiology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City.

"One of the most important findings was that the changes observed were found in interventional radiologists in their mid-40s," says Anna Junk, M.D., lead author and ophthalmologist at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. “Interventional radiologists need 20/20 vision in both eyes to have excellent stereopsis and to perform the delicate procedures demanded in their occupation

Download the entire RSNA article at www.attenutech.com

· · · · · · · · · · · ·

Radiation Protection in Interventional Radiology

Interventional Radiology, Vol. 1, Second Edition

“Interventional radiology procedures can require substantial amounts of ionizing radiation and therefore necessitate particularly close attention to radiation protection…

Because cinefluorography (cine) is an extension of fluoroscopy, all of the previous radiation protection considerations apply; however, radiation exposure is significantly higher for the patient as well as the staff…

The scattered radiation levels shown in Figure 1.4  (next page) were obtained with skin entrance exposure of 2.8 R/min; to depict the cine scattered radiation exposure, the values in the figure should be multiplied by a factor of seven to 32!

Figure 1.4: Maximum Number of Fluoroscopic Procedures in a 3-Month Period without exceeding Eye Exposure of 1.25 R/Quarter

Fig 1.4                                    Radiation Exposure at Eye Level (mR/hr)

Fluoroscopic Time per Procedure (hr)

10         

25

50

100

200

300

0.10

1250

500

250

125

62

41

0.25

500

200

100

50

25